Taughannock Falls Gorge Trail, Ithaca. 2019

Taughannock Falls Gorge Trail, Ithaca. 2019

Daniel M. Hooper
I am currently an Edward W. Rose Postdoctoral Fellow at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and Cornell University. My research revolves around understanding speciation - the origin of species - truly as a process with a focus on Australian grassfinches in the family Estrildidae. I use a variety of comparative and functional genomic approaches together with behavioral assessments of mate preference and cognition in a hybrid context to holistically evaluate how species emerge.

Contact: dmh356@cornell.edu


PEOPLE:

Amelia with a tray of toucans at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in 2018

Amelia with a tray of toucans at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in 2018

Amelia-Juliette Demery
Amelia is a rising second year PhD student in Irby J. Lovette's lab at Cornell University and the Cornell Lab of Ornithology. Her research focuses on what drives phenotypic variation through both an extrinsinc and intrinsic lens with a specialization in avian bills. Amelia is working with me to understand the polygenic basis of bill color variation in the long-tailed finch.


Kelsie holding a Vitelline masked weaver ( Ploceus vitellinus ) in Kenya in 2019

Kelsie holding a Vitelline masked weaver (Ploceus vitellinus) in Kenya in 2019

Kelsie Lopez
Kelsie is a rising third year undergraduate in Biological Sciences with a concentration in Neurobiology and Behavior at Cornell University. She is currently using mtDNA to help evaluate the nature of hybridization in the wild between two subspecies of the long-tailed finch. Kelsie is broadly interested in behavioral ecology and field research.